Untitled Essay Research Paper Something about Charles — страница 2

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developed in him a driving ambition and a boundless energy that transferred into every thing that he did (28). It would be a mistake to think of Charles Dickens as an uneducated man just because he had little formal schooling. Dickens did what everyone should do, learn from life. His entire writing career was a continuing process of development and experimentation. Many of his themes keep repeating themselves throughout his pieces and those themes most certainly stem from his early life. From his early Pickwick Papers to his one of his last pieces The Mystery of Edwin Drood Dickens never ceased to develop his writing abilities and skill, establishing himself as the major and primary Victorian novelist (Bloom 189). The journey from boyhood into manhood is a momentous one, and

definitely something that has a lasting effect on one’s person. Charles Dickens in his novel David Copperfield describes the journey into manhood by telling a story similar to his own life through the life of “David Copperfield.” There isn’t one underlining theme in this novel there are many. The journey is one that along with “David’s” is longing for what is lost in the past and the humiliation he feels from being an orphan. Dickens has written an excellent novel describing the troubles of growing up and the benefits of having a rough childhood. Through the rough experiences that he had, Dickens was able to look back on his early life and write world-famous stories about them. Calvin Brown feel that these experiences also helped shape the man the Dickens became, as

do all experiences in life for everyone (Brown 144) The structure of Dickens’s Copperfield has the freeness and the unity of a wonderful journey. As the scene moves from place to place in the story each move also represents a critical step in David’s spiritual journey to manhood. Dickens uses the pattern of changing scenes to provide both variety and contrast of mood. The atmosphere changes as the story moves along from the Salem House to Blunderstone, giving the story diversity. Dickens constantly shows how the life of David would have been much easier had he had a decent father figure in his home while he was growing up. David is constantly searching for what he has lost in the past. He recalls the beautiful world of the Peggottys when he says, “It seems to me at this

hour that I have never seen such sunlight as on those bright April afternoons, that I have never seen such a sunny little figure as I used to see, sitting in the doorway of the old boat…”(Copperfield 7) This writing of Dickens binds the reader to the story. David remembers the “olden” days and thinks of them as the “golden” days (Allen 28). As the beginning of the story describes, David Copperfield has many hard childhood experiences, such as Dickens’s own humiliating days spent working in the blackening factory in London. The despair and humiliation that he suffered there and the rejection of his parents and the loss of all his hopes of self-fulfillment are relived through David in this book. Dickens tells his own story well through the life of David Copperfield.

He isn’t looking for the readers’ sympathy. He simply wants the reader to understand that just because he had a rough life doesn’t mean it was a bad one. A journey into adulthood, something that everyone must go through, although it may be easier for some than others. Charles Dickens, in David Copperfield, describes this journey as he makes the reader a vital part of David Copperfield’s life. This journey is a theme in this novel as well as “David’s” longing for what is lost in the past and the humiliation he feels from being an orphan. Dickens has developed his character, David, into a hero much like he wanted to be remembered as (Andreola 3). Many critics today think he achieved that goal! Charles Dickens also wrote many other books throughout his creative writing

career. In his book A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens causes the reader to ask what the novel is really about, just what the driving theme is. Although each reader will come up with a different answer to this question, most of the answers fall into one of three categories. Some readers will say that this novel is about the different personalities of the many different and well-described characters throughout his novel. The story portrays a French physician, Dr. Manette, who has been wrongly put into prison in the Bastille for nearly eighteen years before the story even begins (Constable 24). Because he witnessed the aftermath of a crime that was committed by two other fellows, the doctor was thrown into prison. The entire prison experience is something that he can never fully shake