Transcendetalism The New Religion Essay Research Paper — страница 6

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heart; it had no difficulty in accommodating the whole man, accepting his views on simplification and the values of life and nature as integral parts of the challenge proposed in his most famous essay. Gandhi?s Satygraha, which preceded both Gandhi?s and India?s exposure to Thoreau?s views, furnished congenial soil for the nourishment of those features of Thoreau?s message most often resisted by Americans: his agrarianism, his stress upon material simplification, his reverence for life, his Ideal reading of nature, his emphasis upon absolute moral truths, and the pre-eminence of spiritual reality, even his inclinations toward vegetarianism (NCLC, Vol. 21, 353). Transcendental religiosity has shaped other institutions as well. Some of the most profound philosophies like Marxism

and Scientology have been shaped by Transcendentalism. Political parties like the Natural Law Party and the Liberatarian Party have been governed by the Transcendental religion. Environmental factions have preached the significance of earthly stewardship as a result of Transcendentalism. Tax-evaders, naturalists, and clergymen have been influenced by Transcendentalism, and most importantly, Transcendentalism has developed its own research institutions. In conclusion, although Transcendentalists were repulsed by traditional religious establishments, and other semblances of institutionalization, Transcendentalism fulfills the conditions and satisfies the definition of a religion. From its reverence to a Supreme Being, its structure, its moral code, its causes and activities, and

its lasting elements, it can be classified as a religion. By informing its adherents that compliance to moral law, simplicity, non-conformity, and a communion with nature is the process to obtain transcendence, Transcendentalism provides a functional method of achieving a spiritual and heightened state of being, and it, therefore becomes one of the most effective religions that exist. Bibliography Works Consulted Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1972. 400-401. Baker, Carlos. Emerson Among The Eccentrics: A Group Portrait. New York: The Penguin Group, 1996. Bloom, Harold. Modern Critical Views: Henry David Thoreau. New York and Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 1987. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. ?Nature.? The Norton

Anthology: American Literature. Ed. Baym, Nina. New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company Inc. and Ltd., 1998. 1073-1101. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. ?Self Reliance.? The Norton Anthology: American Literature. Ed. Baym, Nina. New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company Inc. and Ltd., 1998. 1127-1143. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. ?The Divinity School Address.? The Norton Anthology: American Literature. Ed. Baym, Nina. New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company Inc. and Ltd., 1998. 1114-1126. Harris, Lanzen Harris., and Sheila Fitzgerald, ed. Nineteenth Century Literature Criticism. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1983. 275-304 Harris, Lanzen Harris., and Emily B. Tennyson, ed. Nineteenth Century Literature Criticism. Vol. 21. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1983. 332-357

Thoreau, Henry David. ?Resistance to Civil Government.? The Norton Anthology: American Literature. Ed. Baym, Nina. New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company Inc. and Ltd., 1998. 1752-1767. Thoreau, Henry David. ?Walden.? The Norton Anthology: American Literature. Ed. Baym, Nina. New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company Inc. and Ltd., 1998. 1768-1943. Yanella, Donald. Ralph Waldo Emerson. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1982.