Title Ix Essay Research Paper Title IXIn — страница 2

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number of certain male sports programs. To comply with title IX, schools have been found to ax, get rid of, the smaller male teams such as wrestling, gymnastics and swimming. In 1982, there were 360 wrestling teams; in 1994 there were 260 teams, which is a reduction of 28%. The men s gymnastics is down 38%, starting at 80 teams in 1982, to 30 teams in 1994, because men s and women s gymnastics usually work together, schools have dropped women s gymnastics too, from 180 to 110 down 39%. All along while schools are axing smaller less popular , the number of football teams is on the rise from 500 to 560 and increase of 10%. With approximately 100 players on each football team and 10 coaches with a huge operating budget, an increase of 60 football teams is huge. I enjoy watching

football. Football is not a bad sport at all. But there is a problem when schools are cutting smaller programs such as wrestling and gymnastics, sports that have athletes which have worked all their lives so they can compete in college, while the football teams are NEVER affected. The average football team in NCAA Division I has 100 athletes, and most colleges have the maximum amount of funding allowed for football teams. A study done in 1994 showed that 73% of all male funding goes to football and basketball programs. That gives the rest of the male teams a measly 27% of the budget to work with, which is not much. Football and basketball teams do make money but they don t make any where near amount of that they put in. In 1993, the average NCAA Division I football team had a

deficit of 1,000,000 dollars, while the average NCAA Division I basketball team had a deficit of 226,000. Approximately 10% of the football teams made a profit in Division I. In 1982, just 10 years after title IX has pass, 76% of football teams made a profit. In 1992, after NCAA reduced the maximum scholarships allowed to football teams by 10%, spectatorship was up 2,000,000. Fans said that there was more parity and the games were more fun to watch. I don t understand how its so hard for them to understand, to increase fan interest in football, universities don t need to increase funding for the teams, but decrease funding and make it a more level playing field. When schools have a problem with money or title IX, they always point the finger at the smaller and cheaper sports such

as gymnastics and wrestling. One example of this is at JMU where we are one of the 90% schools not title IX compliant and some interest in softball has been noticed. Some girls have recently requested a team and the Athletic Director agreed. After looking at the budget, JMU realized that they would still not be title IX compliant and had a big problem funding their 28 sports. They proposed to ax seven teams. They were, men s and women s gymnastics, men s swimming, wrestling, tennis and women s fencing. The proposal didn t go through, but the interesting thing is that JMU never considered taking any funding away from any other sports. Here there are 63 full scholarships for football. The maximum number of players a NFL team can have is 58 players. Do they really need all of that

money?