The Writings Of Ernest Hemingway Essay Research — страница 4

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die. Wyndham Lewis, in the same book of critical essays, points out that Hemingway is obsessed with war, the setting for much of A Farewell to Arms. He feels that the author sees war as an alternative to baseball, a sport of kings. He says that the war years “were a democratic, a leveling, school”. For Hemingway, raised in a strict home environment, war is a release; an opportunity to show that he is a real man. The essayist, Edgar Johnson says that for the loner “it is society as a whole that is rejected, social responsibility, social concern” abandoned. Lieutenant Henry, like Hemingway, leads a private life as an isolated individual. He socializes with the officers, talks with the priest and visits the officer’s brothel, but those relationships are superficial. This

avoidance of real relationships and involvement do not show an insensitive person, but rather someone who is protecting himself from getting involved and hurt. It is clear that in all of Hemingway’s books and from his own life that he sees the world as his enemy. Johnson says, “He will solve the problem of dealing with the world by taking refuge in individualism and isolated personal relationships and sensations”. John Killinger says that it was inevitable that Catherine and her baby would die. The theme, that a person is trapped in relationships, is shown in all Hemingway’s stories. In A Farewell to Arms Catherine asks Henry if he feels trapped, now that she is pregnant. He admits that he does, “maybe a little”. This idea, points out Killinger, is ingrained in

Hemingway’s thinking and that he was not too happy about fatherhood. In Cross Country Snow, Nick regrets that he has to give up skiing in the Alps with a male friend to return to his wife who is having a baby. In Hemingway’s story Hills Like White Elephants the man wants his sweetheart to have an abortion so that they can continue as they once lived. In To Have and Have Not, Richard Gordon took his wife to “that dirty aborting horror”. Catherine’s death, in A Farewell to Arms, saves the author’s hero from the hell of a complicated life. Work Cited Peter Buckley, Ernest, The Dial Press: 1978, p.96. Peter Buckley, p.97 . Peter Buckley, p.98. Peter Buckley, p.104. Peter Buckley, p.104. Peter Buckley, p.112. Peter Buckley, p.114. Peter Buckley, p.117. Peter Buckley,

p.123. Peter Buckley, p.127. Peter Buckley, p.129. Peter Buckley, p.135. Peter Buckley, p.138. Peter Buckley, p.144. Peter Buckley, p.152. Peter Buckley, p.152. Peter Buckley, p.154. Peter Buckley, p.160. Malcolm Cowley, “Rain as Disaster”, Twentieth Century Interpretations of A Farewell to Arms, Jay Gellens, Prentice-Hall, Inc.:1970, pp.54-55. Wyndham Lewis, “The Dumb Ox in Love and War”, Twentieth Century Interpretations of A Farewell to Arms, Jay Gellens, Prentice-Hall, Inc.:1970, p.76. Edgar Johnson, “Farewell the Separate Peace”, Twentieth Century Interpretations of A Farewell to Arms, Jay Gellens, Prentice-Hall, Inc.:1970, pp.112-113. John Killinger, “The Existential Hero”, Twentieth Century Interpretations of A Farewell to Arms, Jay Gellens, Prentice-Hall,

Inc.:1970, pp.10