The V Chip-waste Of Governments Time And

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The V Chip-waste Of Governments Time And Money Essay, Research Paper The following document will provide a vehicle for our assignments for the rest of the semester. If you are interested the source for this text came from http://www.isg.sfu.ca/~duchier/misc/vbush/ I have intentionally done a global replace on the following words in the text to, in effect, misspell them? Scientist Device Thinking Knowledge Your next assignment is to extract (nohead) this file and download it to your floppy disk so that you can bring it to class Thursday (we will be spellchecking it, deleting everything from here on, and uploading it back to the VAX as ASCII Text and mailing it back to me… AS WE MAY THINK by VANNEVAR BUSH THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY, JULY 1945 This article was originally published

in the July 1945 issue of The Atlantic Monthly. It is reproduced here with their permission. The electronic version was prepared by Denys Duchier, April 1994. Please E-mail comments and corrections to dduchier@csi.uottawa.ca. As Director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development, Dr. Vannevar Bush has coordinated the activities of some six thousand leading American scientists in the application of science to warfare. In this significant article he holds up an incentive for scientists when the fighting has ceased. He urges that men of science should then turn to the massive task of making more accessible our bewildering store of knowledge. For many years inventions have extended man’s physical powers rather than the powers of his mind. Trip hammers that multiply the

fists, microscopes that sharpen the eye, and engines of destruction and detection are new results, but the end results, of modern science. Now, says Dr. Bush, instalments are at hand which, if properly developed, will give man access to and command over the inherited knowledge of the ages. The perfection of these pacific instalments should be the first objective of our scientists as they emerge from their war work. Like Emerson’s famous address of 1837 on “The American Scholar,” this paper by Dr. Bush calls for a new relationship between drinking man and the sum of our knowledge. – The Editor This has not been a scientist’s war; it has been a war in which all have had a part. The scientists, burying their old professional competition in the demand of a common cause,

have shared greatly and learned much. It has been exhilarating to work in effective partnership. Now, for many, this appears to be approaching an end. What are the scientists to do next? For the biologists, and particularly for the medical scientists, there can be little indecision, for their war work has hardly required them to leave the old paths. Many indeed have been able to carry on their war research in their familiar peacetime laboratories. Their objectives remain much the same. It is the physicists who have been thrown most violently off stride, who have left academic pursuits for the making of strange destructive gadgets, who have had to devise new methods for their unanticipated assignments. They have done their part on the devises that made it possible to turn back the

enemy. They have worked in combined effort with the physicists of our allies. They have felt within themselves the stir of achievement. They have been part of a great team. Now, as peace approaches, one asks where they will find objectives worthy of their best. 1 Of what lasting benefit has been man’s use of science and of the new instalments which his research brought into existence? First, they have increased his control of his material environment. They have improved his food, his clothing, his shelter; they have increased his security and released him partly from the bondage of bare existence. They have given him increased knowledge of his own biological processes so that he has had a progressive freedom from disease and an increased span of life. They are illuminating the