The Role Of Women In Sir Gaiwan — страница 7

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University of Tennessee Press, 1989. 71-105. Fries, Maureen. “The Characterization of Women in the Alliterative Tradition.” The Alliterative Tradition in the Fourteenth Century Ed. Bernard S. Levy and Paul E. Szarmach. Kent: Kent State University Press, 1981. 25-45. Green, Richard. “Sir Gawain and the Sacra Cintola.” English Studies in Canada 11 (1985): 1-11. Gold, Penny Schine. The Lady and the Virgin: Image, Attitude, and Experience in Twelfth-Century France. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985. Hamilton, Ruth. “Chivalry as Sin in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” University of Dayton Review 18 (1987): 113-17. Kamps, Ivo. “Magic, Women, and Incest: The Real Challenges in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and

Renaissance Studies 1(1989): 313-36. Morgan, Gerald. “The Action of the Hunting and Bedroom Scenes in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” Medium Aevum 56 (1987): 200-16. Warner, Marina. Alone of all Her Sex: The Myth and the Cult of the Virgin Mary. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1976. The Role of Women in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Annotated Bibliography Lili Arkin De Roo, Harvey. “Undressing Lady Bertilak: Guilt and Denial in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” The Chaucer Review 27 (1993): 305-24. De Roo argues that Gawain was enjoying his ‘luf-talk’ with Bertilak’s wife so much that it makes him too attached to life. He draws a connection between the sexual temptation in the bedroom scenes and the acceptance of the girdle. Fisher, Sheila. “Taken Men and

Token Women in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” Seeking the Woman in Late Medieval and Renaissance Writings: Essays in Feminist Contextual Criticism. Ed. Sheila Fisher and Janet E. Halley. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1989. 71-105. Fisher presents a feminist perspective which demonstrates that Morgan, and the other women in the story, are deliberately marginalized because they represent an external threat the male dominated social order of chivalry. Fries, Maureen. “The Characterization of Women in the Alliterative Tradition.” The Alliterative Tradition in the Fourteenth Century. Ed. Bernard S. Levy and Paul E. Szarmach. Kent: Kent State University Press, 1981. 25-45. Fries shows that the characterization of women in the Alliterative Tradition is not confined

to that of the romantic heroine but presents a variety of female archetypes and richly drawn characterizations. Green, Richard. “Sir Gawain and the Sacra Cintola.” English Studies in Canada 11 (1985): 1-11. Green suggests that the poet’s use of a girdle as a symbol may be related to the apocryphal story of the Virgin Mary’s gift of the girdle to Doubting Thomas at the Assumption. He details the ironies it suggest in the story. Gold, Penny Schine. The Lady and the Virgin: Image, Attitude, and Experience in Twelfth-Century France. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985. In Chapter Three, Gold looks at the relationship of the Virgin Mary to other women in Medieval religious iconography and concludes that the Virgin Mary’s image is unique among women. Hamilton, Ruth.

“Chivalry as Sin in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” University of Dayton Review 18 (1987): 113-17. This article suggests that Sir Gawain and the Green Knight presents a broad critique of aspects of chivalry such as Gawain’s attention to form over substance and his confusion between chivalry and religion. Kamps, Ivo. “Magic, Women, and Incest: The Real Challenges in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies 1 (1989): 313-36. Kamps examines some of the disruptive influences and anxieties facing Arthur’s Camelot–specifically women, magic, adultery, and incest–with Morgan representing a trope for all the ills. Morgan, Gerald. “The Action of the Hunting and Bedroom Scenes in Sir Gawain and the Green

Knight.” Medium Aevum 56 (1987): 200-16. Morgan argues that a moral struggle is suggested by the juxtaposition of the hunt scenes and the bedroom scenes, with the Lady in the role of the hunter and Gawain as the hunted. Warner, Marina. Alone of all Her Sex: The Myth and the Cult of the Virgin Mary. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1976. Warner’s book details the special importance of the Virgin Mary throughout Christianity and explores her religious and secular meaning. She discusses such things as the Church’s attitude toward virginity, the role model of the Virgin martyr, the Virgin’s relics, and her role as an intercessor with God. 370