The Movement Of Womens Rights Essay Research — страница 2

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totally dependent on men Strong words… Large grievances… That summer, change was in the air and Elizabeth Cady Stanton was full of hope that the future could and would be brighter for women. The convention was convened as planned, and over the two-days of discussion, the Declaration of Sentiments and 12 resolutions received unanimous endorsement, one by one, with a few amendments. The only resolution that did not pass unanimously was the call for women’s enfranchisement. That women should be allowed to vote in elections was almost inconceivable to many. Even the heartfelt pleas of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a refined and educated woman of the time, did not move the assembly. Woman, like the slave, he argued, had the right to liberty. Newspaper editors were so scandalized by

the shameless audacity of the Declaration of Sentiments, and particularly of the ninth resolution-women demanding the vote! That they attacked the women with all the vitriol they could muster. The women’s rights movement was only one day old and the backlash had already begun! Many of the women who had attended the convention were so embarrassed by the publicity that they actually withdrew their signatures from the Declaration. People in cities and isolated towns alike were now alerted to the issues, and joined this heated discussion of women’s rights in great numbers! The Seneca Falls women had optimistically hoped for “a series of conventions embracing every part of the country.” Women’s Rights Conventions were held regularly from 1850 until the start of the Civil

War. The women’s rights movement of the late 19th century went on to address the wide range of issues spelled out at the Seneca Falls Convention. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and women like Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and Sojourner Truth traveled the country lecturing and organizing for the next forty years. The story of diligent women’s rights activism is a litany of achievements against tremendous odds, of ingenious strategies and outrageous tactics used to outwit opponents and make the most of limited resources. It’s a dramatic tale, filled with remarkable women facing down incredible obstacles to win that most basic American civil right – the vote. Lucy Stone. They were pioneer theoreticians of the 19th-century women’s rights movement. Esther Morris, the first woman to

hold a judicial position, who led the first successful state campaign for woman suffrage, in Wyoming in 1869. Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Mary Church Terrell, organizers of thousands of African-American women who worked for suffrage for all women. Alice Paul, founder and leader of the National Woman’s Party, considered the radical wing of the movement. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, now a Supreme Court Justice, learned the story of the Women’s Rights Movement. Today she says, “I think about how much we owe to the women who went before us – legions of women, some known but many more unknown. After the vote was finally won in 1920, the organized Women’s Rights Movement continued on in several directions. While the majority of women who had marched, petitioned and lobbied for woman

suffrage looked no further, a minority – like Alice Paul – understood that the quest for women’s rights would be an ongoing struggle that was only advanced, not satisfied, by the vote. In 1919, as the suffrage victory drew near, the National American Woman Suffrage Association reconfigured itself into the League of Women Voters to ensure that women would take their hard-won vote seriously and use it wisely. In 1920, the Women’s Bureau of the Department of Labour was established to gather information about the situation of women at work, and to advocate for changes it found were needed. Many suffragists became actively involved with lobbying for legislation to protect women workers from abuse and unsafe conditions. In 1923, Alice Paul, the leader of the National Woman’s

Party, took the next obvious step. She drafted an Equal Rights Amendment for the United States Constitution. Such a federal law, it was argued, would ensure that “Men and women have equal rights throughout the United States.” The idea of woman’s right to control her own body, and especially to control her own reproduction and sexuality, added a visionary new dimension to the ideas of women’s emancipation. This movement not only endorsed educating women about existing birth control methods. For decades, Margaret Sanger and her supporters faced down at every turn the zealously enforced laws denying women this right. So it’s clear that, contrary to common misconception, the Women’s Rights Movement did not begin in the 1960s. First: Esther Peterson was the director of the