The Effects Of Lead Poison On Children — страница 2

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because the body and the brain are not fully developed, which can leave children with subtle but irreversible injuries that does not appear until many years after the exposure of lead(Monheit, 1). In young children, lead retards the development of the central nervous system and brain. Lower levels of lead can reduce their IQ, reading and learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder and behavior problems. When these are added up it causes the student to become a dropout from school and a negative contribution to our communities(Monheit, 1996). The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta (CDC) have found that these injuries occur when blood levels rise to a mere 10 Micrograms per deciliter of whole blood. Lead poisoning is treatable in the early

stages due to the great amount of investigation that the medical and environmental fields have put forth, but the damage that the lead does in a child’s body is not treatable, so once the lead has been damaged, its permanent (Monheit, 1996). The CDC also asks parents to make sure that their child receives a blood-lead test at each pediatric checkup at least until the age of seven. If any of the following symptoms, are obtained by any child consult to immediate emergency care: sluggish behavior, apathy headaches staring periods, tremors, seizures, loss of consciousness abdomen cramps, loss of appetite, constipation irritability hyperactive behavior All of the following symptoms are early stages of lead poisoning and if not treated when possible the symptoms of this poisoning may

lead to a child being put into a coma or even death. (Ways that people can stay informed on lead poison) Information on lead poison today is so easy to get access of. One of the easiest sources of information can be found on the Internet. Many people still do not yet realize how much information it releases. I found that this subject had thousands of documents over the Internet that could be easily reached by the touch of a few keys. Examples of this is: Preventing lead poisoning by the Kiwanis International, Lead Paint Poisoning of Children by the Law Offices of Herbert Monheit, and Lead by ToxFAQs. Besides the Internet they’re other tools that can easily be obtained such as Ebsco Host. This is a program in which one can find information in periodacles over a computer. It

saves a lot of time because one doesn’t have to go to a library and look through periodicals that can take hours. Being this was my first time exploring this program I found many valuable keys of information in it such as: Preventing Childhood Poisoning, the FDA Consumer, which explains the steps that the FDA are taking in order to stay informed on lead and lead poisoning. Lead in Homes Subject to Additional Disclosure by Business Journal of Charlotte magazine. This magazine tells about the new federal regulations on lead-based paint in 1996. If one doesn’t have access of either of these programs most libraries have many books and periodicals that cover this subject. Other programs that stay informed on this issue can be found governmental agencies such as the Alliance to End

Childhood Lead Poisoning, located in Washington D.C.. This Alliance staff offers technical assistance and will help clubs find local contacts who can offer expert advice for local preventing program. Materials and requests are also found through the Alliance. Examples of this is: Guide to State Lead Screening Laws, Resource Guide for Financing, Lead-Based Paint Cleanup, and copies of fact-filled articles from news papers, magazines, and other organizations. Another governmental agency which seems to be on top of this subject is The Environmental Protection Agency. They make the law and requirements on lead in our environment today. The Lead Institute of San Francisco offers free pamphlet on lead poisoning and sells testing kits and books on lead poisoning. Another is the National

Lead Information Center/Hotline located in Washington, D.C. has a variety of brochures and facts sheets aimed at Parents and explaining the dangers of lead poisoning, the importance of testing children, and safe home renovations(Kiwanis International, 1996). In Chicago Illinois the Films Incorporated Video is a programs that obtain video tape and study guides tilted for the awareness of kids in lead hazard areas. These developed films by Consumers Reports Television and Connecticut Public Television can be purchased for a small price(Kiwanis International, 1996). The broadcast media doesn’t play a big role on lead poisoning unless an incident comes along which turns out to affect a large number of people or an important individual. If one needs to stay informed on this