The Earthquakes Of 1811 And 1812 In — страница 2

  • Просмотров 118
  • Скачиваний 4
  • Размер файла 15
    Кб

A.M., we were visited by a violent shock of an earthquake, accompanied by a very awful noise resembling loud but distant thunder, but more hoarse and vibrating, which was followed in a few minutes by the complete saturation of the atmosphere, with sulphurious vapor, causing total darkness. The screams of the affrighted inhabitants running to and fro, not knowing where to go, or what to do – the cries of the fowls and beasts of every species - the cracking of trees falling, and the roaring of the Mississippi – the current of which was retrogade for a few minutes, owing as is supposed, to an irruption in its bed — formed a scene truly horrible. There were several shocks of a day, but lighter than those already mentioned until the 23d of January, 1812, when one occurred as

violent as the severest of the former ones, accompanied by the same phenomena as the former. From this time until the 4th of February the earth was in continual agitation, visibly waving as a gentle sea. On that day there was another shock, nearly as hard as the proceeding ones. Next day four such, and on the 7th about 4 o’clock A.M., a concussion took place so much more violent than those that had proceeded it, that it was dominated the hard shock. The awful darkness of the atmosphere, which was formerly saturated with sulphurious vapor, and the violence of the tempestuous thundering noise that accompanied it, together with all of the other phenomena mentioned as attending the former ones, formed a scene, the description of which would require the most sublimely fanciful

imagination. At first the Mississippi seemed to recede from its banks, and its waters gathering up like a mountain, leaving for the moment many boats, which were here on their way to New Orleans, on bare sand, in which time the poor sailors made their escape from them. It then rising fifteen to twenty feet perpendicularly, and expanding, as it were, at the same moment, the banks were overflowed with the retrogade current, rapid as a torrent – the boats which before had been left on the sand were now torn from their moorings, and suddenly driven up a little creek, at the mouth of which they laid, to the distance in some instances, of nearly a quarter of a mile. The river falling immediately, as rapid as it had risen, receded in its banks again with such violence, that it took

with it whole groves of young cotton-wood trees, which ledged its borders. They were broken off which such regularity, in some instances, that persons who had not witnessed the fact, would be difficultly persuaded, that is has not been the work of art. A great many fish were left on the banks, being unable to keep pace with the water. The river was literally covered with the wrecks of boats, and ’tis said that one was wrecked in which there was a lady and six children, all of whom were lost (http://www.hsv.com/genlintr/newmadrd/ accnt1.htm). This is a very powerful account of the first and second primary shocks. Having never been in an earthquake I cannot imagine “the earth visibly waving as a gentle sea”. There are several other published accounts, however, none as

descriptive and powerful as this one. References http://www.eas.slu.edu/Earthquake_Center/NewMadrid/General.html http://www.eas.slu.edu/Earthquake_Center/Nuttli.1973/Intensity.html http://www.eas.slu.edu/Earthquake_Center/Street/rstreet.html http://www.hsv.com/genlintr/newmadrd/accnt1.htm http://www.slu.edu/Earthquake_Center/ Nuttli.1973/Magnitudes.html http://wwwneic.cr.usgs.gov/neis/eqlists/bigten.lis