Marketing Strategy of the UK Cigarette Industry, Communicaton — страница 2

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marketing are lower, for example, than in the UK or western Europe. We are inviting more tobacco companies to subscribe to the Standards, and we aim to work with regulators to see them incorporated into laws or agreements that ensure effective local implementation. Central to the Standards is our long held commitment to ensuring that no marketing activity is directed at, or particularly appeals to, youth. For example, the Standards make it absolutely clear that our marketing activities should not appeal to youth or suggest that smoking enhances popularity or sporting, sexual or professional success. New baseline Our companies’ adherence to the Standards is covered by a continuous review cycle involving audit committees, internal audit and local management.  In

many parts of the world, existing laws or voluntary codes fall short of the Standards. We have now established a common basis for clearly understood marketing practice. It sets a new baseline for acceptable tobacco marketing worldwide that significantly ‘raises the bar’. Of course in any countries with even tighter restrictions, we will abide by the laws and restrictions those countries set. The new Standards are part of our commitment to supporting, and helping to deliver, balanced tobacco regulation that meet society's expectations, while ensuring that adult consumers can continue making informed choices about a legal product. Dialogue In January 2000 we proposed a Partnership for Change, with 20 practical suggestions for building constructive dialogue amongst the industry,

government, public health groups and others on tobacco issues, including marketing. We aim for the Marketing Standards to be a further basis for building constructive dialogue. We seek to consult with stakeholders on the Standards and welcome their views, including on how best to monitor adherence. Strategies So dominating the tobacco market, Imperial Tobacco pursues an aggressive expansion strategy. Other than its large European market, the group has taken over the Horizon, John Brandon and Peter Stuyvesant brands, which has taken it into the Australian and New Zealand markets, and bought out Tobaccor, the second biggest cigarette producer in Sub-Saharan Africa, giving it a firm foothold on the African continent and in Madagascar.Finally, Imperial Tobacco acquired the licence to

distribute Marlboro (Philip Morris group) in the United Kingdom and in 2002 it took over the German cigarette firm (the world's fourth biggest manufacturer) Reemtsma, thus strengthening its position in Central and Eastern Europe. Gareth Davis, chief executive of the biggest tobacco manufacturer in Britain, Imperial Tobacco, predicted yesterday that there would be no reduction in the number of people smoking in England and Wales following the partial ban on smoking in public spaces, planned by the government for the summer of 2007. Mr Davis said smokers "were resilient and adaptable" and would "quickly learn" the lessons from a smoking ban introduced in Ireland last year. While he attacked proposed restrictions on smoking in public places in England and Wales

contained in the health bill, Mr Davis welcomed the government's decision to provide some consumer choice through exemptions for pubs that do not serve food and for the countries' 20,000 private members' clubs. Profits rise by 11% at Imperial Tobacco as chief dismisses ban · Davis says new law will not stop people smoking · Closure of factories helps raise productivity by 15% Simon Bowers Wednesday November 2, 2005 The Guardian Gareth Davis, chief executive of the biggest tobacco manufacturer in Britain, Imperial Tobacco, predicted yesterday that there would be no reduction in the number of people smoking in England and Wales following the partial ban on smoking in public spaces, planned by the government for the summer of 2007. Mr Davis said smokers "were resilient and

adaptable" and would "quickly learn" the lessons from a smoking ban introduced in Ireland last year. While he attacked proposed restrictions on smoking in public places in England and Wales contained in the health bill, Mr Davis welcomed the government's decision to provide some consumer choice through exemptions for pubs that do not serve food and for the countries' 20,000 private members' clubs. "It is clear that smokers will continue to smoke," Mr Davis said. "There may be an initial dip in consumption but this will diminish over time." He was speaking after Imperial posted an 11% rise, to Ј1.1bn, in underlying pre-tax profit for the year to September 30 on turnover that was 4% higher at Ј3.1bn - in line with analysts' expectations. Three