History Of The Original Lincoln Douglas Debate — страница 2

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talked about everything else he could think to occupy his hour and a half, and when he could not think of anything more to say, without an excuse for refusing to answer these questions, he sat down long before his time was out. Douglas once again became so involved in the speech that he over ran his time limit. The first debate was over. Douglas had left the impression that Lincoln had not answered his questions. Douglas came out on top. The two candidates were schuduled to meet again six days later in Freeport. For the next six days, Lincoln carefully worked out his answers to Douglas s questions and formed four questions of his own. All the questions were designed to emphasize the difference between the Little Giant and the Danties. Lincoln like Douglas traveled around the

state making independent speeches; however, Douglas was suffering from a severe bronchial affection from which he had not yet entirely recovered. Douglas arrived in Freeport the day before the debates. A cheering crowd lined the street to his hotel greeted him. Lincoln on the other hand arrived at ten o clock the next morning and also was welcomed by a crowd of thousands. The debate began at two o clock in the afternoon. Lincoln was the first to speak. He lost no time in taking up Douglas interrogatories. I purpose to devote myself during the first hour to the scope of what was brought within the range of his half-hour speech at Ottawa. Of course there was brought within scope in that half-hour s speech something of his own speech. In the course of that opening argument Judge

Douglas proposed to me seven distinct interrogatories. In my speech of an hour and a half, I attended to other parts of his speech, and incidentally, as I thought, answered one of the interrogatories then. I then distinctly intimated to him that I would answer the rest of his interrogatories on condition only that he should agree to answer as many for me I now propose that I will answer any of the interrogatories, upon condition that he will answer questions form me not exceeding the same number. I give him an opportunity to respond. The Judge remains silent. I now say to you that I will answer his interrogatories, whether he answers mine or not and that after I have done so, I shall profound mine to him. Lincoln clearly devised Douglas down fall. He continued with the Asbury

questions. Question 1. I desire to know whether Lincoln to-day stands, as he did in 1854, in favor of the unconditional repeal of the Fugitive Slave Law? Answer: I do not now, nor ever did, stand in favor of the unconditional repeal of the fugitive slave law. Question 2. I desire him to answer whether he stands pledged to-day, as he did in 1854, against the admission of any more slave states into the Union, even if the people want them? Answer: I do not know, nor ever did, stand pledged against the admission of a new state into the Union. Question 3. I want to know whether he stands pledged against the admission of a new state into the Union with such a constitution as the people of that state may see fit to make. Answer: I do not stand pledged against the admission of a new

state into the Union, with such a constitution as the people of that may see fit to make. Question 4. I want to know whether he stand to-day pledged to the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia? Answer: I do not stand to-day pledged to the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia. Question 5. I desire him to answer whether he stands pledged to the prohibition of the slave trade between the different states? Answer: I do not stand pledged to the prohibition of the slave trade between the different states. Question 6. I desire to know whether he stands pledged to prohibit slavery in all the territories of the United States, north as well as south of the Missouri Compromise line? Answer: I am impliedly, if not expressly. Pledged to a belief in the right and duty

of Congress to prohibit slavery in all the United States territories. Question 7. I desire him to answer whether he is opposed to the acquisition of any territory unless slavery is first prohibited therein. Answer: I am not generally opposed to honest acquisition of territory; and, in any given case, I would or would not oppose such acquisition, accordingly as I might think such acquisition would or would not aggravate the slavery question among ourselves. Following these questions, Lincoln also included his answers to the questions. His answers revealed not only his lawyer s approach to a question, but also his cautious conservatism. Lincoln finished his speech by refuting the accusation of being a part of the Black Republican Party. It was then Douglas turn to speak. Douglas