Ad Reinhardt Abstract Painting 19601965 Essay Research — страница 2

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Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum had just opened in New York, offering a new collection a chance for artists to show work. As the 60’s came, so did a new president and a war. John F. Kennedy was to be the new president. A young, energetic, All-American male from Harvard. He gave a new image to the presidency and the country. The Vietnam War was beginning and the government was developing new weapons. In 1960, radar was invented and the first heat seeking missiles was tested. The Museum of Modern Art had exhibited Jean Tinguely’s, Happening, a self-destroying sculpture. In 1961, the U.S. Airforce sent a chimp into space to orbit the earth. The Civil Defense officials distributed 22 million copies of the pamphlet, family fallout shelter. In 1962-63, Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s

Soup paintings are shown. Alber’s exhibits his, Homage to the square. Digital marketed the first Mini-computer. John Glenn becomes the first American to orbit the earth. 250,000 march for Civil-Rights in Washington, D.C. President John F. Kennedy is assassinated in Dallas, Texas. In 1964-65, U.S. planes bomb North Vietnam. China explodes its first A-bomb. The first U.S. combat troops land in Vietnam. 1,3500 U.S. troops were killed in Vietnam and 5,300 were wounded. In the five years during the creation of this painting, a tremendous amount of serious events took place. New work was being created. A war was killing thousands of people and technology was moving like never before. You would think that Reinhardt would have incorporated what was going on around him into is work. The

opposite is true. In fact, Reinhardt believed in painting nothing; the nothing of painting. Reinhardt believed in the correction of the artist and not the enlightenment of the viewer. For Reinhardt, painting was all about the artist; the viewer was secondary if even considered. Reinhardt had said, “An artist who dedicates his life to art, burdens his art with his life and his life with his art.” Reinhardt believed that art was “out of time”, and that there was no real placement for art in periods etc. Reinhardt writes of the 25 lines of words on art: Statement (1955), (a few examples from the text) 1. Art is art, everything else is everything else. 9. Painting as “not as a likeness of anything on earth.” 22. The most common mean to the most uncommon end. 25. The most

universal path to the most unique. And vice-versa. Reinhardt claimed his work was about painting and only painting. It is possible that this was his reaction to all the negative events going on in the world. His concentration on the painting as a painting and the painter was absent of politics and technology. Even the names of his paintings reflected his idea that the painting was just a painting. It seems appropriate that he would choose to paint this way in this time. He chooses to ignore the worlds happening and dig deeper into the meaning of painting itself. Reinhardt wanted his paintings to not reflect its surroundings: “a pure abstract, non-objective, timeless, spaceless, changeless, relationless, disinterested painting- an object that is self conscious (no

unconsciousness) ideal, transcendent, aware of nothing but art.” Reinhardt would continuously work on a painting, forever restoring it in the same manner he painted. The paintings were returned to his studio and restored to the way they where when they left. Reinhardt’s paintings are “non-entertainment, not for commerce or mass-art publics, non-expressionist, not for oneself.” Ad Reinhardt: Abstract Painting 1960-1965: Research “Ad Reinhardt’s black paintings are often initially greeted with hostility by viewers. The balanced geometric divisions, often in the shape of a cruciform, and the subtle variations in form are at first impossible to discern. These inert black squares have the quality of an Egyptian mirror that forces one’s image back to oneself. The black

paintings seem then truly to achieve Reinhardt’s goal to push painting beyond its thinkable, seeable, feelable limits, to a highly physical and psychological condition (Abstraction: Geometry: Painting).” That is how Reinhardt’s painting were perceived and how they’re still often seen. Ad Reinhardt’s Paintings, as well as the paintings of Joseph Albers, Brice Marden, John McLaughlin and other “color field/minimalist painters, were often greeted with great hostility and misunderstanding. Especially when they were exhibited for the first time. Hostility seems to be a reasonable reaction to most color field painting due to frustration. The frustration of not being sure what you’re seeing. You could almost feel conned by assumed simplicity of the canvas and paint. The