A Doll House 2 Essay Research Paper — страница 2

  • Просмотров 275
  • Скачиваний 12
  • Размер файла 15
    Кб

as whether or not she bought macaroons. Nora goes through life with the illusion that everything is perfect. When a woman of that time loves as Nora thinks she does nothing else matters. She will sacrifice herself for the family. Her purpose in life is to be happy for her husband and children. Nora did believe that she loved Torvald and was happy. She had a passionate and devoted heart that was willing to do almost anything for her husband. At first she did not understand that these feelings were not reciprocated. Torvald does not want a wife who will challenge him with her own thoughts and actions. The final confrontation between the couple involves more oppression by Torvald, but by this time Nora has realized the situation he wishes to maintain. Torvald calls her a

“featherbrained woman” (1606) and “blind, incompetent child ” (1609) even though she saved his life. Nora expected Torvald to be grateful to her. This does not happen. When Torvald says, Now you have wrecked all my happiness- ruined my future (1606) and I m saved! (1606), Torvald exhibits his self-absorbed nature. The fury Nora saw after Torvald s opening of the letter showed Nora a strange man. Someone she had not been wife to, someone she did not love. Their marriage is fake and mutually beneficial because of their social status. They are not really in love. Nora says, Yes. I am beginning to understand everything now. (1606) It is now that she can begin to apprehend her forgery was wrong, not because it was illegal, but because it was for an unworthy cause. This is when

the readers see Nora embark into her transformation of her authentic character. Nora decides that the only way to fix the situation is to leave Torvald and her children and find herself independently. Slowly Nora s character is forced to discontinue her inauthentic role of a doll and seek out her individuality, her new authentic identity. She comes to realize that her whole life has been a lie. She lived her life pretending to be the old Nora, and hid the changed woman she had become. The illusion of the old Nora continues well after she becomes a new person. When she realizes that responsibilities for herself are more important, Nora slams the door on not just Torvald but on everything that happened in her past. It took time to evolve into a new person, but after she did she

became a person who could not stand to be oppressed by Torvald any longer. Nora says, I ve been your wife-doll here, just as at home I was Papa s doll-child. (1608) Ibsen uses the idea of a doll because a doll always maintains the same look, no matter what the situation. A doll must do whatever the controller has them do. Dolls are silent and never express opinions or actually accomplish anything without the aid of others. This doll is Nora s inauthentic identity. Her authentic identity is in the process of being built while Torvald calls Nora his little lark , his little squirrel , and a child. Nora grows even stronger. It is complete and presented to the readers when Nora when she stands up to Torvald and does the opposite of what he wants. Nora tells Helmer at the end of the

play that, I have to try to educate myself. You can t help me with that. I ve got to do it alone. And that s why I m leaving you now (1609). Nora tells Helmer, . . . I m a human being, no less than you-or anyway, I ought to try to become one. (1609) She does not tolerate Torvald’s condescending tone or allow him to manipulate her any longer. Nora must follow her own convictions now and decide for herself what her life will be in the future. Her rebirth has led to her own independence. Another man will never again control her and she is now free of her controlling husband. In conclusion Michael Meyers quote The common denominator in many of Ibsen s dramas is his interest in individuals struggling for and authentic identity in the face of tyrannical social conventions. This

conflict often results in his characters being divided between a sense of duty to themselves and their responsibility to others. is applicable to Nora in A Doll House. Nora Helmer is a character struggling to realize her authentic identity. Her husband Torvald has always established her identity. Throughout the play Torvald was condescending towards Nora and forced her to act and look in a way that pleased him. Nora allowed Torvald to play dress up with her and no matter what the situation Nora has to consistently remain Torvald’s quiet, happy, little doll. Nora ends her doll life by leaving her doll house to learn and explore on her own. She is no longer a doll under the control of her master.